Arthur Ashe Dies Feb06

Arthur Ashe Dies

1993 – Arthur Ashe Dies Tennis player Arthur Ashe dies on February 6, 1993. Ashe was the first African American to win the Wimbledon, U.S. Open and Australian Open championships. During heart bypass surgery, Ashe contracted the HIV virus from a tainted blood transfusion and eventually died from AIDS. On , He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton on June 20, 1993. 1820 – The Mayflower of Liberia The first organized emigration back to Africa begins when 86 free African Americans leave New York Harbor aboard the Mayflower of Liberia. They are bound for the British colony of Sierra Leone, which welcomes free African Americans as well as fugitive slaves. 1933 – Walter E. Fauntroy born Walter E. Fauntroy was born in Washington, D.C. He went on to become a District of Columbia delegate to the House of Representatives. 1945 – Bob Marley Bob Marley, Jamaican reggae star is...

Hank Aaron Born Feb05

Hank Aaron Born

1934 – Hank Aaron Born Henry “Hank” Aaron was born on born February 5, 1934, in Mobile, Alabama. Aaron would become one of the greatest players in Major League baseball history but his greatest moment came when he broke the home run record of Babe Ruth on  On April 8, 1974. He would eventually be named to the Baseball Hall of Fame on August 1, 1982. For more information on Aaron, see his profile on greatblackheroes.com. 1990 – Barack Obama named President of the Harvard Law Review Columbia University graduate and Harvard University law student Barack Obama became the first African American named president of the Harvard Law Review. 1950 – Birthday of Natalie Cole Singer Natalie Cole, daughter of legendary singer Nat Cole, born in Los Angeles, California. Singing professionally at age 11, by 1976 Cole had won Grammys for New Artist of the Year and Best R&B Female...

Rosa Parks Born

1913 – Rosa Parks (born Rosa Louise McCauley) was born on this day. Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. Thursday, December 1, 1955, in downtown Montgomery, Alabama, Parks boarded a bus driven by James Blake.  When a white man entered the bus, Blake ordered the Blacks to move to the back of the bus. The other three Blacks complied with Blake’s order and got up and moved by Rosa simply moved laterally into the window sat. Blake asked her if she was was going to stand up, and she said, “No, I’m not.” Blake told her “Well, if you don’t stand up, I’m going to have to call the police and have you arrested” to which she responded, “You may do that.” Blake called for the police and she was arrested and taken to the police station where she was booked, fingerprinted and incarcerated. Parks was charged with disorderly conduct based on violating Chapter 6, Section 11 of the Montgomery City Code, which provided for segregation. She was found guilty and fined but her action of defiance symbolized the beginning of the civil right movement that began to get national attention. The resulting Montgomery bus boycott crippled the bus industry in Montgomery and forced it to change its segregationist seating policies. For more information on Rosa Park, view her profile on greatblackheroes.com. 1986 – A stamp of Sojourner Truth is issued A stamp of Sojourner Truth is issued by the U.S. Postal...

University of Alabama Admits First Black Student Feb03

University of Alabama Admits First Black Student...

1956 – U of Alabama First Black Student Autherine Juanita Lucy becomes the first black student to attend the University of Alabama. She was born on October 5, 1929 in Shiloh, Alabama and attended Linden Academy from which she graduated in 1947. She then attended Selma University in Selma, Alabama and then Miles College, an all-Black school from which she graduated in 1952 with a Bachelors degree in English.  She decided to attend the University of Alabama to obtain a Masters degree and  and consulted with the NAACP, which assigned Thurgood Marshall, Constance Baker Motley and Arthur Shores as her attorney to prepare paperwork for the legal battle they knew she would have to endure. On June 29, 1955, they secured a court order preventing Lucy from being barred from applying based on her race.  The Supreme Court of the United Sates upheld this order and Lucy was able to officially register for classes. She was unable to live in any of the dormitories or to eat in any of the dining halls, however. On February 3, 1956, she enrolled in the University’s graduate program seeking a degree in Library Science. When a mob tried to bar her from entering one of the buildings, the police were called in to escort her, but the University expelled her after saying that it could not provide a safe environment for her and then claimed that she had slandered the school. A lawsuit against the University was unsuccessful and for 32 years the expulsion was in effect. In 1988, the University of Alabama reversed the decision to expel her and she was admitted to the University and received a Master’s in Elementary Education on May 9, 1992, the same day her daughter Grazia Foster also graduated, with a degree in Corporate...

President Truman Sends Congress Anti-Lynching Message...

1948 – Truman sends Congress Anti-Lynching Message President Truman sent Congress a special message urging adoption of a civil rights program, including a fair employment practices commission and anti-lynching and anti-poll tax measures. 1915 – Biologist Ernest E. Just Receives Spingarn Medal Biologist Ernest E. Just receives the Spingarn medal for his pioneering in cell division and fertilization. 1862 – District of Columbia abolishes slavery District of Columbia abolishes...

Negro History Week Established Feb01

Negro History Week Established...

1926 – Negro History Week Begins What is now known as Black History Month, was first celebrated on this date as Negro History Week by Carter G. Woodson. It became a month long celebration in 1976. 1865 – First African American Before US Supreme Court John Sweat Rock (1825-1866), a noted Boston lawyer, became in 1865 the first African-American to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and the first Black person to speak before the U.S. House of Representatives. 1952 – Singer Rick James born Rock/Funk singer Rick James is born 1978 – The first stamp of the U.S. Postal Service’s The first stamp of the U.S. Postal Service’s Black Heritage USA series honors Harriet Tubman, famed abolitionist and “conductor” on the Underground...

Greensboro Sit-ins Take Place...

1960 – Greensboro sit-ins takeplace The primary event took place at the Greensboro, North CarolinaWoolworth’s store, now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum. 1997 – First 24-Hour Black Movie Channel BET Holdings and Encore Media Corp. launch BET Movie/Starz the first 24 hour Black Movie channel. 1978 – The first stamp of the U.S. Postal Service’s The first stamp of the U.S. Postal Service’s Black Heritage USA series honors Harriet Tubman, famed abolitionist and “conductor” on the Underground...

Doug Williams, the first African American quarterback to play in a Super Bowl game, is named MVP in Super Bowl XXII. Jan31

Doug Williams, the first African American quarterback to play in a Super Bowl game, is named MVP in Super Bowl...

1988 – Washington Redskins quarterback Doug Williams Washington Redskins quarterback Doug Williams, the first African American quarterback to play in a Super Bowl game, is named MVP in Super Bowl XXII. 1962 – First Black to Command U.S. Warship Samuel L Gravely becomes first Black person to command a U.S. warship. 1931 – Baseball star Ernie Banks born Baseball great Ernie Banks, former Chicago Cub star, was born in Dallas, TX. 1914 – Boxer Jersey Joe Walcott born Boxer Jersey Joe Walcott was born Arnold Raymond Cream in Merchantville, New Jersey. Walcott won the World Heavyweight Championship from Ezzard Charles, whom he knocked out in the 7th round of their 1951 title bout in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Walcott had 69 professional fights. He won 30 of them by knock-out and was...

13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution Passes by the House of Representatives Jan31

13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution Passes by the House of Representatives...

1865 – Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment which, on Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment which, on ratification, abolished slavery in America. The vote in the House was 121 to 24. 1919 – Baseball Great Jackie Robinson born In Cairo, Georgia on this date baseball great Jackie Robinson was born. The fifth African American to play major league baseball with a white team, Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, ending five decades of segregated baseball. At the time of his retirement in October 1972, Robinson is believed to have been t… 1934 – Etta Moten sings for President Etta Moten sings for President and Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt at a White House Dinner. It is the first time an African American actress performs at the White...

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s House Bombed...

1956 – Home of Martin Luther King Jr Home of Martin Luther King Jr. Montgomery bus boycott leader bombed. 1900 – John Parker, Underground Railroad Conductor died Born: 1827 Died: January 30, 1900 Birthplace: Norfolk, Virginia John P. Parker was born in Norfolk, Virginia , the son of a white father and a slave mother. He was sold to a slave agent from Richmond, Virginia at age eight. Parker worker for two years at a foundry and the New Orleans docks as a steved… 1844 – Richard Theodore Greener Richard Theodore Greener becomes the first African American to graduate from Harvard University  ...

Oprah Winfrey Born

1954 – Oprah Winfrey birthday American television personality whose syndicated daily talk show is among the most popular was born in Kosciusko, Miss. 1926 – Violette Neatley Anderson Violette Neatley Anderson is the first African American woman admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court 1981 – William R. “Cozy” Cole, jazz drummer, dies. William R. “Cozy” Cole, jazz drummer, dies. His recording of “Topsy” became the only drum solo to sell more than one million...

Matthew Henson Receives a Joint Medal from Congress Jan28

Matthew Henson Receives a Joint Medal from Congress...

1944 – Matthew Henson receives a joint medal by Congress Matthew Henson receives a joint medal by Congress for his role as co-discoverer of the North Pole 1934 – Baseball Outfielder William “Bill” White born Baseball outfielder William “Bill” White was born in Lakewood, Ohio. Now baeball’s National League President, White played in 1,673 games and ended his career with a .286 batting average on 1,706 hits. He won the Golden Glove award in 1960 and 1966. 1938 – First Black Woman elected to a state legislature Crystal Byrd Fauset was elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. 1970 – Arthur Ashe, first Black male to win Wimbledon, is denied entry to Arthur Ashe, first Black male to win Wimbledon, is denied entry to compete on the US Team for the South African Open tennis championships due to Ashe’s sentiments on South Africa’s racial policies 1986 – Ronald McNair dies in Challenger disaster On this day in 1986 astronaut Ronald McNair died in the space shuttle Challenger disaster. Surviving him are his wife Cheryl McNair and children. 1989 – Colgate Redesigns “Darkie” Toothpaste After 62 years of racial caricatures, Colgate-Palmolive Co. redesigned packaging for its “Darkie” toothpaste sold in Asia. The logo for the toothpaste, previoulsy a black face sambo character named “Darkie,” was renamed “Darlie” and replaced with a...

Ralph Ellison wins National Book Award....

Ralph Ellison’s powerful novel, Invisible Man, wins the National Book Award. Ralph Ellison’s powerful novel, Invisible Man, wins the National Book Award. 1972 – Mahalia Jackson Gospel music legend Mahalia Jackson dies this day in Evergreen Park,...

Executive Order 9981, to end segregation in US Armed Forces is signed by President Harry Truman Jan26

Executive Order 9981, to end segregation in US Armed Forces is signed by President Harry Truman...

 1948 – Executive Order 9981, to end segregation in US Armed Forces is signed by Preside Executive Order 9981, to end segregation in US Armed Forces is signed by President Harry Truman 1893 – First Black American woman aviator, Bessie Coleman was born, 1893 First Black American woman aviator, Bessie Coleman was born, 1893 1944 – Activist, Angela Davis was born Activist, Angela Davis was born 1958 – Birthday of Anita Baker, Grammy award winning singer. Birthday of Anita Baker, Grammy award winning...

Constance Baker Motley Sworn in as Federal Judge Jan25

Constance Baker Motley Sworn in as Federal Judge...

1966 – Constance Baker Motley Constance Baker Motley – becomes the first african american woman to be appointed to a federal judgeship 1980 – Black Entertainment Television – BET Black Entertainment Television {BET} – first black owned company to be listed on the NYSE, begins broadcasting from Washington, DC 1851 – Sojourner Truth addressed the first Black Women’s Rights Convention, Akron, Ohio. Sojourner Truth addressed the first Black Women’s Rights Convention, Akron,...

Jackie Robinson Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame Jan24

Jackie Robinson Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame...

1962 – Jackie Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Jackie Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. 1993 – Thurgood Marshall, dies First Black Supreme Court Justice, Thurgood Marshall, dies, 1993 1949 – Birthday of Aaron Neville, singer Birthday of Aaron Neville, singer 1977 – Howard T Ward becomes Georgia’s first Black Superior Court Judge Howard T Ward becomes Georgia’s first Black Superior Court...

24th Amendment to U.S. Constitution Jan23

24th Amendment to U.S. Constitution...

1964 – 24th Amendment The 24th Amendment to the US Constitution is ratified. It abolishes poll tax, which was used as a means of preventing african americans from voting 1977 – ABC-TV begins televising the Roots mini-series (which would go on to be the most ABC-TV begins televising the Roots mini-series (which would go on to be the most watched mini-series in history), based on Alex Haley’s book 1821 – Liberia Minister Lott Cary left the United States leading a group of freed slaves, most of whom were members of the American Colonization Society, to colonize a small portion of West Africa. This area became known as the Republic of Liberia in 1847. 1941 – Richard Wright wins the Spingarn Medal for “Native Son” Richard Wright wins the Spingarn Medal for “Native...

Sam Cooke Born

1931 – Sam Cook, Father of Soul Music, born. Singer Sam Cook, the son of a minister and believed by many to be the first father of soul music, was born in Chicago, Illinois. Cook began his singing career with a gospel group known as the Singing Children. His fame came in 1965 with “You and Me,” “Only 16,” and his very famous “Stand By Me” and “Shake, Rattle and… 1800 – Nat Turner born Nat Turner born 1948 – George Foreman, two-time heavyweight boxing champion, was born in Marshall, TX. George Foreman, two-time heavyweight boxing champion, was born in Marshall, TX. In a 1973 Kingston, Jamaica bout, he defeated Joe Frazier to receive the haveyweight championship. Foreman kept the title for 22 months until losing it to Muhammad Ali. 1949 – James Gladden 1st certified orthopedic surgeon January 22, 1949 – James Robert Gladden becomes first African American certified in orthopedic...

Carl Rowan Named Director of the U.S Information Agency...

1964 – Carl T. Rowan named director of the United States Information Agency. 1906 – Willam Brown-Chappell was born Pioneer aviator, Willam Brown-Chappell was born, 1906 1773 – Phillis Wheatley freed Poet Phillis Wheatley, born a slave in 1754, was freed and her first book of poetry, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, was published. The book of poetry is said to have been widely acclaimed in the United States and...

Colin Powell Named Secretary of State Jan20

Colin Powell Named Secretary of State...

2001 – First Black Secretary of State Colin Luther Powell is sworn in by President George W. Bush as Secretary of State. He is the first black secretary of state in U.S. history. 1977 – William T. Coleman Steps down as Secretary of Transportation On this date William T. Coleman stepped down Secretary of Transportation. Coleman was an attorney and civil rights activist. He was the first Black to serve as a Supreme Court law clerk, working for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter in 1948. He was appointed as the Secretary of Transportation by President Gerald Ford in 1975. 1986 – Ronald McNair On January 20, 1986, Ronald McNair (1950-86) was the first black astronaut killed during a space mission, when the space shuttle “Challenger” met with disaster. McNair, a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was assigned to the shuttle “Challenger” which blew up shortly after take-off. 1947 – Josh Gibson Dies Baseball’s Josh Gibson Negro league star/National League Hall of famer dies on this...

Page 1 of 3123